Posts Tagged ‘Chrome’

No root for you! Google slams door on Symantec certs

Soup Nazi

Google being ‘alarmist’ claims Symantec

The four-month row between Google and Symantec over SSL certificate issuing has just gone nuclear, with the Chocolate Factory making good on its threats and beginning a blockade.

“Over the course of the coming weeks, Google will be moving to distrust the ‘Class 3 Public Primary CA’ root certificate operated by Symantec Corporation, across Chrome, Android, and Google products,” said Google software engineer Ryan Sleevi.

“Symantec has decided that this root will no longer comply with the CA/Browser Forum’s Baseline Requirements. As these requirements reflect industry best practice and are the foundation for publicly trusted certificates, the failure to comply with these represents an unacceptable risk to users of Google products.”

Sleevi said that Symantec had informed Google that the root certificate would be used for purposes other than for publicly trusted connections, but isn’t saying what else they might be used for. As a result, it’s on Google’s naughty list.

“Symantec has indicated that they do not believe their customers, who are the operators of secure websites, will be affected by this removal,” Sleevi said. “Further, Symantec has also indicated that, to the best of their knowledge, they do not believe customers who attempt to access sites secured with Symantec certificates will be affected by this.”

Read More by Iain Thomson

Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS

art google chrome logo picture

If you’ve been wondering why the battery life on your Windows laptop or tablet seems so lousy, your Chrome web browser might be to blame – and it may have been sapping your system’s juice for years.

A documented bug in the source code for the Chromium open source project seems to account for the mysterious power drain that some users of Google’s web browser have been experiencing.

The aggravating part for many users, however, is that the bug was first filed for Chrome version 22, way back in September 2012, yet Google has so far ignored it.

The problem has to do with how Chrome forces Windows machines to manage processor idle time. When a computer isn’t doing much, it sends its CPU to sleep to save power, waking up at intervals when if there are any events that need handling. On Windows, these checks normally happen every 15.625ms, but that interval can be adjusted – and this is where Chrome goes awry.

Read more By Neil McAllister

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