PCR’s guide to PC gaming components Despite fast adoption of IoT, 72% don’t know how to protect their smart devices

Despite fast adoption of IoT, 72% don't know how to protect their smart devices

66 per cent of consumers are worried about hacks and breaches against their IoT devices, and 72 per cent don’t know how to protect themselves from these risks, according to new research from BullGuard.

The mobile and internet security provider surveyed over 6,000 UK residents, finding that 34 per cent have already experienced a security incident or privacy problem.

The report reveals that 78 per cent of consumers expressed concern about security risks such as viruses, malware and hackers, while 66 per cent of consumers expressed concern over data collected by device manufacturers being inappropriately used or stolen. 57 per cent of consumers are also anxious about privacy breaches.

Read More by Laura Barnes

BT apologises after nationwide broadband failures

BT logo

BT has apologised after “several hundred thousand” UK customers had their broadband services cut off.

Down detector, a website that monitors internet failures, reported thousands of cases, including in Glasgow, London, Birmingham and Sheffield.

At about 23:00 GMT BT said it was confident services had been “fully restored” but that some customers might need to reboot equipment.

The company said a faulty router was to blame for the problem.

BT phone services were unaffected by the outage, which began about 14:30 GMT.

A spokeswoman added: “Most customers will be able to access their broadband without taking any action but some may need to reboot their equipment.”

Hundreds of people took to social media to express their frustration using the hashtag #BTdown, which began trending on Twitter.

Source and Read More BBC New Technolody

Hundreds of thousands of engine immobilisers hackable over the net

Homer Simpson driving

Kiwi hacker finds brutal holes in location, tracking units

Kiwicon Kiwi hacker Lachlan Temple has found holes in a popular cheap car tracking and immobilisation gadget that can allow remote attackers to locate, eavesdrop, and in some cases cut the fuel intake to hundreds of thousands of vehicles, some while in motion.

The gadgets are rebranded white box units from Chinese concern ThinkRace that allow users to attach to their cars to enable remote tracking, engine immobilisation, microphone recording, geo-fencing, and location tracking over a web interface.

In Australia the units badged as “Response” sell for about A$150 at electronics chain JayCar or through some mechanics who offer to install the devices.

One of the unit’s relay leads is commonly attached to car fuel pumps as a means to remotely-immobilise stolen vehicles.

But session cookie vulnerabilities turn that function – in the worst case scenario – into a means to shut off fuel supply to cars while in motion over the internet.

Read More by Darren Pauli

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